All posts by drishism

About drishism

Love. Explore. Advocate. Rejoice. Note. http://www.ishism.com

On Writing… and Critics

It is May 2nd, 2015… and I have seen the Avengers: Age of Ultron twice. I did not go to a Thursday night showing, but a friend and I went to see it twice on Friday. We purchased our tickets a few weeks ago. We watched Age of Ultron first at noon in IMAX 3D, and then again at 4 p.m. in regular 3-D. During the break between our first and second viewings, we discussed the various choices the writer/director Joss Whedon made in the film. This post is not about the Avengers… it is more of a reflection on what it’s like to have your work out there. Being judged. By the entire world.

Yesterday when I was discussing the movie with my friend, I was fine pointing out the good things about the film… and the things that might need improvement. But when I woke up this morning, I was reminded of my novel. My novel is currently marinating, which means I am not working on the novel, but other people are reading it to give me feedback to make it better. The novel, which will be released sometime this summer, will be available for the entire world to read. And to critique.

Will my book have places that could be improved or done differently? Yes.
Will there be places of brilliance that should never be changed? I hope so. But the idea of having my work out there… not being read simply for enjoyment… but critiqued, is a concept I have not really thought about before. It’s kind of intimidating. I felt comfortable critiquing Joss Whedon’s movie from the comfort of my own chair… like many critics. Many online critics with anonymous handles (which prevent them from ever really being identified) are lobbing negative and positive reviews of the movie at Joss Whedon. Being anonymous allows people more freedom to critique. Some day, if my novel is even mildly successful, I will have anonymous reviewers lobbing positive and negative reviews of my work.

My friend and I both enjoyed the movie. Even though Age of Ultron failed to beat Harry Potter’s opening Friday with a paltry $84-million dollars, it has been very successful in it’s first two days in the U.S.A. (opened Thursday night). Some of the criticisms of Joss Whedon’s “Age of Ultron” seem mean-spirited, while others are more complimentary.

People feel really comfortable critiquing a movie, or a book, pointing out every flaw. But as an author, a creator of that work… it kinda sucks. How do you deal with the critical reviews of your work? Do you read them? Ignore them? Hide your head inn the sand? What do you do?

Featured Image -- 2886

4 Date Night Ideas to Replace Boring Old Movie Night

Originally posted on TheReporterandTheGirlMINUSTheSuperMan!:

Turn your weekly date night into a romantic rekindling of love or do something silly and new together. Choose new activities that go beyond Red Box to something more unique and thrilling.

Studies show that when you tailor your date to something of more substance, you stimulate your brain’s reward system and ignite the love that brought you together in the first place, according to intimacy specialist and professor of social psychology, Arthur Aron. So, reconnect with your significant other by shaking things up on an alternative date night.

Ask the 36 Questions

Create interpersonal closeness with your partner by turning to Aron’s famous list of 36 questions for a unique date night. Discover a deeper connection and level of intimacy by becoming vulnerable in your self-disclosure. Go on an afternoon picnic, sit together next to a stream or get a table in a romantic restaurant and ask each other…

View original 391 more words

Featured Image -- 2883

5 white-collar jobs robots already have taken

Originally posted on Fortune:

For years now, some researchers have been anticipating that robots would take away jobs from humans. In the UK, Deloitte and the University of Oxford predicted that 10 million unskilled jobs could be taken over by robots. University of Oxford researchers Carl Benedikt Frey and Michael Osborne estimated in 2013 that 47 percent of total U.S. jobs could be automated and taken over by computers by 2033.

Some experts say not to worry because technology has always created new jobs while eliminating old ones ones, displacing but not replacing workers. But lately, as technology has become more sophisticated, the drumbeat of worry has intensified. “What’s different now?” asked Leigh Watson Healy, chief analyst at market research firm Outsell. “The pace of technology advancements plus the big data phenomenon lead to a whole new level of machines to perform higher level cognitive tasks.” Translated: the old formula of creating more…

View original 247 more words

Copy Editing, and Marinating the Novel … A Writer’s Journey

I am copy editing my novel.  Copy editing is not as fun as voice editing. In fact, copy editing is tedious and somewhat boring. For indie authors, I generally forgive some grammar/typos because I know they could not afford a copy editor. But I do not expect that same level of grace from someone who will read my book.

I am doing the best I can, and almost at the writing stage where I let friends read the book. This is what I call the marinating stage, because I will not be working on the book. But my friends will be reading it and giving feedback. I will use their feedback to make the book even better. But copy editing feels like I have ripped the soul out of the writing process. It no longer feels creative. It’s about form, structure, etc.

Once I officially start the marinating stage, it could involve a few rewrites :-(

I did my best to create dynamic, interesting characters. I generated an amazing, fast-paced story. Now I’m making the sentences readalicious.